Bill Pickett Museum

BillPickett-ExhibitLocated in the east wing of the Coliseum, the William “Bill” Pickett Museum pays tribute to the Rockdale legend whot laid the foundation for today’s popular steer-wrestling event when he developed a method of bulldogging. His success on the rodeo circuit also opened the door for other African American cowboys . Voted a favorite by Fort Worth Stockyards visitors, the pictures and artifacts in this display tell the story of cowboy performance through the years.

Bill Pickett

He invented the technique of bulldogging, the skill of grabbing cattle by the horns and wrestling them to the ground. It was known among cattlemen that, with the help of a trained bulldog, a stray steer could be caught. Bill Pickett had seen this happen on many occasions. He also thought that if a bulldog could do this feat, so could he. Pickett practiced his stunt by riding hard, springing from his horse, and wrestling the steer to the ground. Pickett’s method for bulldogging was biting a cow on the lip and then falling backwards. He also helped cowboys with bulldogging. This method eventually lost popularity as the sport morphed into the steer wrestling that is practiced in rodeos.

Pickett soon became known for his tricks and stunts at local country fairs. With his four brothers, he established The Pickett Brothers Bronco Busters and Rough Riders Association. The name Bill Pickett soon became synonymous with successful rodeos. He did his bulldogging act, traveling about in Texas, Arizona, Wyoming, and Oklahoma.

In 1905, Pickett joined the 101 Ranch Wild West Show that featured the likes of Buffalo Bill, Will Rogers, Tom Mix, Bee Ho Gray, and Zach and Lucille Mulhall. Pickett was soon a popular performer who toured around the world and appeared in early motion pictures, such as a movie created by Richard E. Norman. Pickett’s ethnicity resulted in his not being able to appear at many rodeos, so he often was forced to claim that he was of Comanche heritage in order to perform. In 1921, he appeared in the films “The Bull-Dogger” and “The Crimson Skull.”

In 1932, after having retired from Wild West shows, Bill Pickett was kicked in the head by a bronco and died after a multi-day coma. Bill Pickett has a headstone beside the graves of the Miller brothers at the Cowboy Hill Cemetery, but he is buried near a 14-foot stone monument to the friendship of Ponca Tribal Chief White Eagle and the Miller Brothers on Monument Hill, also known as the White Eagle Monument to the locals, less than a quarter of a mile to the north-east of Marland in Noble County, Oklahoma.

ColiseumExteriorIn 1971, he was inducted into the National Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame. Another tribute to Pickett, a life-size bronze statue, welcomes visitors to the Coliseum grounds.

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Cowtown Coliseum -- Fort Worth Stockyards - 121 E.Exchange Ave. Fort Worth. TX - 1-888-COWTOWN